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Australian Mining Companies Join Suicide Prevention Program

As Australia celebrates R U OK Day, an industry has been working on its own awareness program. More than 1,000 construction and business sites across the country are taking part in MATES in Construction Fly the Flag Day, a campaign to raise awareness of suicide prevention.

MATES national chief executive Chris Lockwood said the number of participating sites has more than doubled last year’s, indicating greater momentum for the program.

“For the first time this year we have mining and energy businesses participating along with construction sites,” said Lockwood.

As part of its campaign, the organisation has trained over 140,000 workers to develop life-saving skills to recognise co-workers’ possible struggles and intervene when needed. According to Lockwood, 190 Australians who work in the construction industry take their own life each year, accounting for a suicide every second day. Australian Mining reported that construction workers are six times more likely to die from suicide than a workplace accident.

“The construction industry, which is predominantly male, has a culture that can often leave workers feeling isolated and not knowing how to ask for help,” said Lockwood.

“Factors such as job insecurity, high work demands, and financial stress combined with relationship breakdowns put workers in the construction industry at greater risk and MATES will continue to do all we can to prevent suicides in this and similar high-risk industries.”

Brad Geatches, MATES chief executive for Western Australia said that the industry was partly responsible for workers’ distress due to its competitive, insecure nature. However, ”society is generally becoming more aware of the issue of mental health and suicide, it’s coming out of the shadows, stigmas are breaking down,” said Geatches.

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