Category archive: Service

News: Labor Vows to Reverse Penalty Rate Cuts

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has pledged to reverse the cuts to Sunday penalty rates if Labor wins the upcoming election.

Cuts to weekend penalty rates for workers in retail, hospitality and fast food industry will be applied starting July 1, under a decision by the Fair Work Commission.

“I promise you this: a new Labor government will restore the Sunday penalty rates of every single worker affected by this cut,” Shorten said at an address to the Australian Council of Trade Unions in Sydney Tuesday night.

Labor’s bill to block the cuts was voted down 73 to 72 in Parliament in June.

Labor employment spokesperson Brendan O’Connor said the party will continue to fight against the cuts when parliament resumes in August.

Earlier this month, Employment Minister Michaelia Cash accused Shorten of hypocrisy on the matter.

“Bill Shorten has no problem with reducing penalty rates when he himself does it, and when his union mates do it in deals with big businesses,” said Cash. “He only objects when an independent umpire does the same thing for small business.”

‘The Way They Manipulate People is Really Saddening’: Study Shows the Trade-Offs in Gig Work

Sarah Kaine, University of Technology Sydney; Alex Veen, RMIT University; Caleb Goods, University of Western Australia, and Emmanuel Josserand, University of Technology Sydney

Uber driver Michelle, thinks her job is fantastic when she’s only after part-time hours. But she’s given it a couple of months and she says she’s not getting anywhere.

To be able to earn A$800 she has to actually pull in A$1,500, averaging 70 hours a week. The money per hour can be good, but only when it really picks up. Looking at the current job market, she doesn’t want to do two full-time jobs to make the same amount of money that she used to earn in an office, working half the time.

She feels exhausted. She used to think people in Melbourne were good drivers, but now that she’s been driving all day, she sees a fair amount of aggression. Six weeks ago she was trying to merge into traffic and a man in a ute next to her showed her a crowbar.

Her latest day off she spent sleeping because she was so tired.

Michelle (not her real name) was one of our study participants. We interviewed 60 ridesharing and food delivery workers like her. And the reality of their experiences is far more nuanced than others make out.

Work in the “gig economy” is often depicted as flexible by businesses and those who run the platforms that offer work, or as exploitative by labour activists and commentators.

A key finding is that gig workers arbitrate between the costs and benefits of gig work. Many interviewees preferred their gig work over other forms of low-paid work (most commonly cleaning, hospitality, retail) because of abusive bosses, underpayment, and underemployment. In comparison, gig work is seen by these workers as providing a more appealing work environment.

While some rideshare drivers note they need to work long hours to earn the equivalent of a full-time wage, they also emphasise their enjoyment of their rideshare work. One food delivery worker summed it up:

It is more flexible. You can do whatever you want. You are on the street talking to the people enjoying. You can do exercise as well on the bicycle. And, it is good money.

Despite these workers’ sense that there are opportunities in gig work – their experience was not overwhelmingly positive. There was a group of workers who felt marginalised, had few choices, and the gig work was a last resort.

These workers saw gig work as a stopgap measure while they looked for “real” jobs. In these cases they were doing it because it got them out of the house, to supplement their income or before starting their own business.

Social versus isolating

The workers in the study saw social interactions as part of their gig work as one of the more enjoyable aspects. What varied between rideshare and food delivery workers was how these interactions took place.

Food delivery drivers often end up crossing paths during their shifts and informally waiting together. As one worker summed up:

You end up knowing most of the riders, because you see them pretty often. You kind of speak with each other, and there is a social club.

By contrast rideshare drivers noted that their work could be quite physically isolating. Some drivers engaged in online forums with other drivers but would never meet up with them. Despite limited social interaction with other drivers, rideshare drivers reported that this is where they derived most of their job satisfaction.

Freedom versus control

The drivers we interviewed expressed a sense of freedom and flexibility because they had “no boss, no set hours”. However, the flip side of this was a sense of limited control over work. As one food delivery worker described:

I currently fit my life around their work…obviously I have to work around busy times – lunch and dinnertime.

Both delivery riders and rideshare drivers – found that only particular pockets of time across the day were profitable. This was usually lunch and dinner times, especially weekends for food delivery, and weekends and evenings for rideshare drivers. So while their options to sign on or off the app (the platform that employed them) were flexible, realistically their productive working hours were determined by patterns of consumer demand.

Both the rideshare and food delivery platforms also unilaterally changed the terms and conditions of engagement, which directly affected earning potential. Both groups of workers expressed particular concern about the periodic increases in the commission taken by the platform, reporting cuts to earnings of up to 15%. One driver lamented:

The way they [the platform] manipulate people….is really saddening.

Ridesharing workers were also concerned about being financially over-committed due to the cost associated with purchasing and running a vehicle. This financial burden, coupled with continued changing rules of game, and the capacity for these platforms to arbitrarily “deactivate them” led to anxiety and frustration. One worker described this:

It used to be good before they did all the price cuts and started treating their drivers like trash. We have had 30% cuts since I came on board whilst demand hasn’t matched supply. I make around $10 an hour.

Best of a bad lot

Our emerging findings suggest gig workers often understand the trade-offs between the positive and negative features of their work but see this as a reality of their position within the labour market.

A number of our interviewees felt exploited and/or would prefer better paying “real jobs”, validating the concern on regulation, pay and conditions in this industry. But, gig work allows these workers to meet their immediate needs and gives them a sense of being their own boss.

The ConversationThe gig workers enjoyed the high levels of autonomy in their work, and many of them saw their gigs as the best in a market characterised by low paid jobs.

 

Sarah Kaine, Associate Professor UTS Centre for Business and Social Innovation, University of Technology Sydney; Alex Veen, Lecturer – Early Career Development Fellow, RMIT University; Caleb Goods, Lecturer – Management and Organisations, UWA Business School, University of Western Australia, and Emmanuel Josserand, Professor of management, University of Technology Sydney

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

News: Sunday Penalty Rate Cuts to be Phased In Over Four Years

The Sunday penalty rate cuts will be phased in over the next four years in a move that angered both employers and unions.

The Fair Work Commission ruled that the reductions to existing penalty rates for fast food, hospitality, retail and pharmacy employees will not take full implementation until 2019-2020.

Fast food and hospitality workers will have Sunday penalty rates cut by 5 per cent next month, and 10 per cent in 2018 and 2019. Their final penalty rate cuts will be 125 per cent and 150 per cent respectively.

Retail and pharmacy workers will take a 5 per cent cut this year, and a further 15 per cent every year until 2020. Their penalty rate cuts will be reduced from 200 per cent to 150 per cent.

Unions argue that the pay cut would devastate workers who sacrificed their weekends to earn money. “I think no matter which way you dress it up, you’re facing pay cuts every single year,” said Australian Council of Trade Unions secretary Sally McManus. “Australian workers are already suffering as a result of stagnant wage growth… They can’t afford a $1.42 billion wage cut.”

On the other hand, employers believe the reductions should be phased in two years instead of four. “Retailers need a break and they need it now,” said National Retail Association chief Dominique Lamb.

Russell Zimmerman, head of the Australian Retailers’ Association, also said the long phase-in period prevents businesses from employing more staff. “What this will do is create an incredible amount of extra work for retailers, who won’t be able to employ more people as quickly as they would like,” he said.

Employment Minister Michaelia Cash said the decision showed the commission’s impartiality. “Nobody got exactly what they wanted. The unions wanted it set aside, employer groups wanted a speedier transition process,” Cash said. “What this does now is give certainty.”

Nevertheless, Cash insisted that the cuts are helpful for small business while impacting only three to four per cent of Australia’s workforce. “The adjustments to Sunday penalty rates will even the playing field for Australia’s small businesses, which have to pay more for staff on Sundays than big businesses who do deals with big unions,” Cash said. “This will help thousands of small businesses open their doors, serve customers and create jobs on Sundays.”

How to Manage Your Finance when Freelancing

Freelancing has become a dream for many due to its promising freedom – being able to choose your own jobs, set your own working hours, and avoid the usual office structures. However, there are also more risks in freelancing, such as irregular income, lack of health insurance and more. Here are a few tips to help you manage your finances as a freelancer.

Save up for emergency fund

The common advice is to save up three to six months-worth of living expenses as an emergency fund, but Bundle suggests freelancers should save up six to nine months. This is to prevent financial breakdown when there are no jobs, or when the payment from client doesn’t come on time. Jamie Beckman, New York-based freelance writer and author of The Frisky 30-Day Breakup Guide, saved about seven months’ worth of money before jumping into the field. “In retrospect, I’d probably recommend saving more than that just in case,” said Jamie.

“I was able to get a good amount of work right off the bat, so I haven’t been dependent on my savings (knock on wood!), but having a healthy financial cushion buys me peace of mind.”

Track your time

According to freelance writer Laura Shin, tracking the time spent on work will help you calculate your income per hour, per job. “A freelancer’s main currency besides money is time, so it’s imperative to know how you’re spending it,” said Shin. “That per-hour “rate” also helps me see what places I should work for less, where I should try to work more, or even where I might want to request a raise.”

Set your rate accordingly

“If you’re used to thinking about the $X/hour rate from your old job, that rate won’t work now that you freelance, unless you are able to fill all 40 hours of your week working on projects,” said Shin. “Most freelancers will need to charge rates that take into account the time you’re running your business but not necessarily charging a client, plus the additional expenses of paying your own benefits.”

For example, a freelance graphic designer should not only charge for hours spent working on an ordered project, but also the hours spent on researching, liaising with the client(s), and other additional expenses which might not be directly related to the project, such as electricity, internet, health insurance and more.

Discuss milestone payment plans with your clients

When involved in a long-term project that spans multiple weeks or months, it is wise to discuss a milestone payment option with your client to make sure you receive income on a regular basis throughout the period rather than having it all sent in one go at the end of the project. Walter Green of Lifehacker suggests three ways to make it work:

“If a job is for a certain time period or number of hours, make sure you can bill your client each month or for every so many hours you log. If there are obvious milestones within the project, set up your billing around those. If nothing else, break the job up into 25% blocks and bill for each of those.”

Should You Get a Private Health Insurance?

As Australian residents, we already have a public health insurance – Medicare, which provides you with free or subsidised access to a variety of health care options. However, what about private health insurance? Should you get an additional one, or is your money better spent elsewhere?

The advantages of getting a private health insurance are quite numerous: those with private health insurance have more freedom in choosing preferred doctors and specialists, quicker access (read: shorter waiting time) for elective surgeries, and access to services that are not covered by Medicare such as dental, optical, physiotherapy, and chiropractor.

Private health insurance can also be used to gain some financial benefits. If you earn more than $90,000 per year, or if your family earns more than $180,000, taking a private health insurance will exempt you from the Medical Levy Surcharge, which ranges from 1 to 1.5 per cent.

Medical levy surcharge rate, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018. Source: ATO

For those aged 31 years old and under, owning private health insurance would also avoid them from paying extra lifetime health cover loading. Taking private health insurance after the age of 31 would render one liable for extra two per cent surcharge for every year delay.

It is best to consider if these advantages suit your financial circumstances. For more information, read up The Conversation‘s and CHOICE‘s articles on this subject. You can also take a quiz to see if you really need a private health insurance.